“blogs are like Marmite”

blog

“Blogs are like Marmite” This was a comment I received when I first floated the idea of using blogs, to capture scholarly activity.   Our love/hate relationship with blogs is a sentiment I can relate to.   I have avoided writing blogs for a long time. However, over the years I have gained a great deal from reading blogs, both personally and I’m fairly sure to some degree professionally. However, if I was asked to pin point what I have gained, I probably would struggle to identify an individual blog or its impact.

Looking into the issue of how vocational practitioners can capture scholarly activity, blogging I believe is the logical answer. An academic may embark on a research project what does a vocational practitioner do?  Commonly, we attend update events regarding the qualifications we deliver. We aim to partake in industrial updating (although this can be hit and miss). At best an NVQ assessor can assess part time and continue working in the profession. Other forms of activity in the vocational world include, standardisation and moderation activities and also expanding the qualification range. All these can be captured easily on a CPD log, however, where is the impact of these activities and do they represent scholarly activity?   I am hoping that through a series of blog posts on this site, I can demonstrate that  these activities can capture scholarly activity.

So why is a blog the logical answer? It’s reflective nature has greater potential to capture impact than a more traditional CPD log.

How often will I blog?   I have a list of over ten blog topics which I would like to produce immediately. These are based around one activity each blog with the aim of relating the said activity to a scholarly aim. After this initial flurry of activity I will be scheduling writing once a fortnight and keeping a log of activities to blog about.

How to blog? I am new to blogging, this is my first attempt. I have read the below two blogs on blogging (and there will be plenty more openly available). I am hoping that my skills will evolve with time.

Learning to blog is one of my scholarly activities, how to measure its success is a different story.

http://www.thedaringlibrarian.com/2014/12/11-reflective-blogging-tips.html

http://www.theguardian.com/higher-education-network/2015/oct/16/share-your-ideas-how-to-write-for-the-higher-education-network?CMP=share_btn_tw

Image obtained from – Image obtained here

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4 responses

  1. Hello Anita, it’s me again. I have found blogs a satisfying way of summing up some aspect of H818 for my own purposes, and looking back over my blogs is quite a neat way of reminding myself of issues I have been interested in. My previous tutor commented that he just used his blog as a kind of personal diary but I would be keen to get a wider readership – but that is the flaw in my current practice as I don’t get many comments.
    What are your plans to network your blog?
    johnbaglow.wordpress.com

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi John

      Thank you. That is a really good question and also a really good test of the next step of my website. Please follow below link. You should be able to add to the document.

      https://anitajhoughton.wordpress.com/2016/01/18/how-to-network-your-blog

      Like

      1. The link doesn’t work for me.

        Like

      2. Hi John

        A good test. I’m not sure if I’m trying to confuse wordpress this afternoon or its trying to confuse me.

        https://anitajhoughton.wordpress.com/2016/01/18/how-to-network-your-blog/
        I think the above link should work.

        Thanks
        Anita.

        Like

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